The classic BS I have to deal with….

January 20th, 2009 at 7:10 pm by Glenn
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcQ7RkyBoBc

And yes. It is six months old. And no. It won’t get old.


Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

One Response to “The classic BS I have to deal with….”

  1. Mark Says:

    The job does, though.

    I just love I-D-Ten-T errors and the fact that Sales always threatens to tell the Company President.

    It’s also funny how Sales always screams, “Scheduled Maintenance from 2AM to 6AM? I can’t do my job with that kind of downtime! I have to have these Quarterlies out by tomorrow!”

    Quarterlies, by definition, come out every quarter year, and are, in most circumstances, the function of Accounting departments. This is much the same as how all Customer Service is relegated to the Customer Service department, except the part where a company wants to ask you for more money for something they probably should have provided properly in the first place. I’m not sure where these types get their Sales degrees, but it certainly isn’t Business school…

    “I have a sales meeting in five minutes!” generally means, “I have to run to Starbucks and spend $7 for a cup of coffee that I’d bitch about if I bought it for $1.39 at McDonalds!” … an attitude which carries over into most companies bottom lines. And yet, when the shit hits the fan, they’re the ones who end up retained — due in no small part to the fact that they relegate every single part of their job to other departments and nobody within any given management structure seems to notice — because it’s always those “dumbasses in Customer Service,” the “clusterfucks in accounting,” the “morons in manufacturing,” or “those goddamn assholes in IT!” *shakes head*

    It is for those reasons, and the subsequent — yet unbalanced — love-hate relationship with sales departments that makes me refer to them as, “Those S&M people…”

    Animosity? Bitterness?

    No … Just real-world observations.

    I’ve worked for companies before and been asked to clean house. Guess where I started, and how much the bottom-line increased?