Posts Tagged with "customer service"

Counterfeit $40 Bills?

February 22nd, 2014 at 5:44 pm by Mark
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I once tried to pay for my coffee at Dunkin Donuts with two Kennedy fifty-cent coins. I say tried because they told me, “We don’t accept foreign currency.”

Subway: We Only Hire the Best.  "At noon on Aug. 1 a Subway employee reported that a customer was attempting to pass a counterfiet $40 bill. Police found the currency, a $50 bill, was genuine."

LifeHack: Disorganized Computer Cables

February 12th, 2014 at 5:43 pm by Mark
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Many times in Business settings, someone will complain about, “so many cables,” going to the back of a rack full of servers. I like to send them this.

Lifehack Dilemma: Cables are Disorganized.  How to hack it: 1. Grab a few binder clips (one for each cable). 2. Put them on your eyeballs. 3. Now your eyes are closed and literally all your problems are gone. Hacked?

Stock Photos

Apple Returns iPhones to Chinese Manufacturer, Foxconn

April 30th, 2013 at 5:03 pm by Mark
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Last week, Apple returned as many as eight million iPhones to Foxconn, citing the exact same reasons that iPhone users have complained about for years.

Conan O'Brien: "Apple has returned eight million iPhones to a Chinese manufacturer because they weren't fit for sale.  Apple complained the phones couldn't place calls, the screens cracked easily, and had faulty batteries.  In other words, they were iPhones."

Math Is *NOT* Hard

February 21st, 2013 at 5:08 pm by Mark
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Last week I purchased a burger at Burger King for $1.58. The countergirl took my $2 and I was digging for my change when I pulled 8 cents from my pocket and gave it to her. She stood there, holding the nickel and three pennies, while looking at the screen on her register. I sensed her discomfort and tried to tell her to just give me two quarters, but she hailed the manager for help. While he tried to explain the transaction to her, she stood there and cried.

Why do I tell you this?

Because it has to do with the evolution of teaching math since the 1950s…

  • Teaching Math In 1950s:

    A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price.

    What is his profit ?

  • Teaching Math In 1960s:

    A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price, or $80.

    What is his profit?

  • Teaching Math In 1970s:

    A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80.

    Did he make a profit?

  • Teaching Math In 1980s:

    A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80 and his profit is $20. Your assignment: Underline the number 20.

  • Teaching Math In 1990s:

    A logger cuts down a beautiful forest because he is selfish and inconsiderate and cares nothing for the habitat of animals or the preservation of our woodlands. He does this so he can make a profit of $20.. What do you think of this way of making a living? Topic for class participation after answering the question: How did the birds and squirrels feel as the logger cut down their homes?

    (There are no wrong answers, and if you feel like crying, it’s ok.)

  • Teaching Math In 2009:

    Un hachero vende una carretada de maderapara $100. El costo de la producciones es $80.

    ¿Cuanto dinero ha hecho?

  • Teaching Math In 2010:

    Who cares, just steal the lumber from your rich neighbor’s property. He won’t have a gun to stop you, and the President says it’s OK, anyway, because it’s redistributing wealth.

If you can’t do math, you have no business working a cash register.

Math Problems?  Call 1-800-[(10x)(13i)^2]-[sin(xy)/2.362x]

Source: Unknown

Customer Service via Social Media

November 25th, 2012 at 7:29 pm by Mark
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It’s amazing to see major corporations and brands embracing the Internet for Customer Service purposes. Companies are no longer faceless entities disconnected from their customer base. Every day, many more are finding value in reading and responding both to praise and criticism.